Contact Us_

DSEA, 136 E. Water St. 
Dover, DE 19901
1-866-734-5834 (toll-free)
FAX 302-674-8499

DSEA, 4135 Ogletown-Stanton Rd.
Suite 101 Newark, DE 19713
302-366-8440 (not a toll-free number)
FAX 302-366-0287 

Contact DSEA by Email
DSEA Elected Officers: governance@dsea.org
Executive Director:
execdirector@dsea.org

Website Concerns: communications@dsea.org
 

 

Contact DSEA Departments
Communications: 
communications@dsea.org
Instructional Advocacy: instruction@dsea.org
Government Relations: govrelations@dsea.org
Membership: membership@dsea.org
Member Benefits: memberbenefits@dsea.org

Directory of DSEA Locals

 

News Articles on High-Stakes Testing

Article: Your Children Are More Than a Number To Us

Publication: NEA Today

Synopsis: Two educators in Tulsa, Oklahoma have gone public in their refusal to administer the standardized testing regime imposed on their elementary school students, regardless of the consequences.


Article: Parents and Educators to Lawmakers: Testing is Not Learning!

Publication: NEA Today

Synopsis: Across the country, NEA members and parents are sending the same message to legislators and policy makers: Too much classroom time is caught up in testing, testing, testing, testing, and more testing!


Article: Some parents across the country are revolting against standardized testing

Publication: Washington Post

Synopsis: A growing number of parents are refusing to let their children take standardized tests this year, arguing that civil disobedience is the best way to change what they say is a destructive overemphasis on tests in the nation’s public schools.


Article: 'Teach to the Test' robbing newcomer students of previous language-learning time

Publication: NEA Today

Synopsis: As Congress rewrites the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) – also known as No Child Left Behind (NCLB), ESL students across the nation are experiencing fewer teachable moments.  Why? No time.


Article: Kindergarten Readiness Tests Wasting Valuable Teaching Time

Publication: NEA Today

Synopsis: Even a 5-year-old could figure out this simple math: Take 20-plus Maryland kindergartners and one teacher. Require that teacher to spend at least one hour, but more likely an hour and a half, with each of her new students during the first six weeks of the school year, administering one-on-one the state’s newest standardized test.  What do you get? A waste of time.


Article: Florida DOE audit an epic fail for overtested public school students

Publication: Education Votes

Synopsis: Florida Education Commissioner Pam Stewart has recommended a reduction in state-mandated tests for public schools following a Florida DOE investigation. The findings prompted current Florida Gov. Rick Scott to suspend the 11th-grade English test by executive order.  But his action won’t affect the testing outlook for most students.


Article: New Book Scrutinizes National Obsession with 'The Test'

Publication: NEA Today

Synopsis:  In The Test: Why Our Schools Are Obsessed with Standardized Testing – But You Don’t Have to Be, Anya Kamenetz, National Public Radio’s lead education blogger and author of several previous books, makes a compelling case against the current testing regime, but also presents a framework of potential alternatives that could foster real teaching and learning in the classroom.


Article: The Very Best Policy Memo on Testing

Publication: "Curmudgucation" blog

Synopsis: In a mere dozen pages (several are endnotes), Kevin G. Welner and William J. Mathis deliver a clear and thorough response to those who insist that annual standardized tests need to be the engine that drives the pubic education system.


Article: Poll: Parents Want An End to the Testing Obsession

Publication: NEA Today (PDK/Gallup Poll)

Synopsis: Educators are pushing back against high stakes testing across the nation, and, according to a new poll, parents are on their side.


Article: Poll: Public Rejects Teacher Evaluations Based on Student Test Scores

Publication: NEA Today (PDK/Gallup Poll)

Synopsis: Only 38-percent of the public, and only 31-percent of parents, support using  student standardized test scores to evaluate teachers, opposition that is trending upward.